Echo: A Dystopian Science Fiction Novel

I’m in accounting class and I raise my hand.  The professor rolls his eyes; he hates me ‘cos I’m creative and because I’m not excited by a dad-bod and the office lifestyle.  “Yes, Kent?”  I lower my hand and ask, “Why are we obsessed with learning a financial system that’s proven to be compromised by predators?  Why don’t we focus more on understanding human nature and tailor our systems around that instead of installing unresponsive bureaucratic failsafes?”  His face twists in rage.  “HOW DARE YOU QUESTION THE SYSTEM!!!”  He reaches under his desk and starts shooting at me with a belt-fed M60.  One of his kiss-ass stooge-students steps up beside him and runs the ammo belt through his hands, making sure the rounds feed correctly into the gun.  I dive and roll to the side, running in a crouch with my hands covering my head.  Chewed-up desk parts and papers fly up around me as I dash out the door.  The professor sprints after me, and just as I cut into the hallway, I know I’m done for:  He has fire superiority and I have zero cover out here.  On top of that, other professors hear the gunfire and I see them run out of their classrooms.  Their faces twist gleefully as they see that my time has come, and they produce various rifles and machine guns and begin firing on me as I careen through the hallway.  I desperately fumble my eReader open to Echo.  Magic flash.  A platoon of Space Marines appear and aggress forward in a beautifully smooth display of close quarters combat, their gauss rifles stuttering out controlled shots.  I make my escape as the fury rages behind me.

When the System comes for you, make sure there’s a platoon of Space Marines ready to get your back.  Get Echo Vol. 1 on Kindle here:  Vol. 1 on Kindle.  Vol. 2 on Kindle here:  Vol.2 on Kindle. Links for Vol.1 AND Vol.2 on Smashwords/Nook/iBooks/Kobo are available here:  Echo on other platforms

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5 thoughts on “Echo: A Dystopian Science Fiction Novel

  1. It’s cliche for a professor forcing students not to think about the systematic problems. I’m a college student in Eastern Asia, there are really few students courageous enough to talk or ask questions like that. But we SHOULD !!

    Liked by 1 person

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