About the Author: Kent Wayne

Hello everybody, my name is Kent Wayne.  I’ve started getting requests for more personal info so I thought I’d put up this author page.  I know it is commonly practiced social media etiquette to have lots of pictures and access to personal life available, but I tend to veer the other way.  I like my privacy.  Sorry if that offends you.  I’m not trying to be rude.

I spent around ten years in the military.  I was never a sex-nuts strong, roided-out Bin-laden-wasting-stud, nor was I a fat, whiny, high-and-tight (it’s the stereotypical military haircut) wearing pencil-pusher that lived to yell at people about uniform and haircut regulations because he was bullied in high school and couldn’t get a date (sorry about the bluntness, that’s the military for you).  Within those two extremes, I fall somewhere in between.  I’m not going to get specific about units or what branch I was in.  That was a different person, and it doesn’t matter now anyways.  I’m out and done with that stuff.  While it definitely informs my writing, the chapter has closed on that part of my life.

I prefer not to be thanked for my service.  Plenty of great articles out there that can express why better than I ever could.

My view on the military, just to try and give you some insight on my perspective (without waxing overly long):  The military is a reflection of society.  Of humanity.  Within it, you can find behavior that is villainous, heroic, idiotic, and genius.  The full spectrum.  And just like life, one person can exhibit some of each.  That’s pretty much always the case, too.  Nobody is a badass 100% of the time.  Nobody is a piece of shit 100% of the time.  I find most portrayals of the military reductive in that it doesn’t recognize this basic fact:  The military is made up of humans, and they are subject to human nature.  When it becomes clear that shitbags can become amazing and heroes can become convicted of child molestation and end up as scum, then the folly of using a label to reduce somebody to hero, baby-killer, badass, or brainwashed becomes shortsighted and childish.

This is everywhere, not just the military.  I’m resigned to the idea that humans love to turn something into an easy-to-get-riled about, simplistic point of view.  But I have seen it get better as I get older, so I have hope.  I think the internet and the increased ease of sharing information has a lot to do with it.

The great lesson I learned from the military:  Ideals are nice and soul-stirring, but people tend to get blinded by them.  It is the ability to perceive the minutely relevant changes instance to instance, circumstance to circumstance, that will carry you.  It is not comfortably reductive idealism, but all-inclusory awareness that will let you navigate not just life, but all of existence.

(Hops off the soapbox)  I know that’s a poor bio, but I hope that through my obnoxiously grandiose statement you will find out more about me than if I were to list a chronological series of life events.  And I hope it wasn’t too pretentiously poetic.  As a character from one of my favorite authors said about a bunch of mentally masturbatory goth vampire wannabes:  “Too much time on their hands.  Leads to poetry.”  (Just kidding.  I love poetry.  Some of it.  Maybe.)

Thanks for checking out my works!  To all you writers, I wish you inspired drafting and insightful editing!

Kent Wayne

Follow me on Facebook:  Kent Wayne

Follow me on Twitter:  Kent Wayne 108

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708 thoughts on “About the Author: Kent Wayne

    • Still, you served during the Vietnam era, which was like a completely different universe than the military I observed. If some of the stuff that went on back then (fragging officers, going on patrol while high, etc. etc.) it would be a major news story today. I bet you’ve experienced or have heard your fair share of craziness!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I thank you Kent Wayne. Most excellent site. The architecture is bee-yoo-tiful. many obligin’s for the follow. Must admit I wanted to say, “following what?” Namaste

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank You So Much for the compliment! I try to get in some follows and likes on a daily basis in order to put out some good karma. (It also, it seems, has a side effect of getting people to follow me back and get interested in my work, which is pretty darn nice!) If you need stuff shared or advertised let me know and I will be happy to do so! I’m a bit scatter-brained due to my multiple irons in the fire, so please don’t feel shy about asking me; it’s not an imposition. Good luck with your blogging adventures! 🙂

      Like

      • Wouldn’t that be multiple ions in the fire. Indeed, I will. Trying to ex-cape the rat race and I think I’ve found a small hole…must gnaw it bigger..
        I do have a kindle app, let me know. Title, author, etc. Got class in an hour, must dash…

        Liked by 1 person

    • I’m working on the paperback right now, but I’m still in the process of editing and getting the logistics together. It’ll probably be a few more months. It is possible, however, to use a smartphone, tablet to get the kindle app and read the book that way if you don’t have a kindle. Also, the kindle website has an app that allows you to read an e-book through your browser, no download required. Thank You for your interest Tangential! I’ll try to push that paperback out as fast as possible! 🙂

      Like

  2. Kent, I appreciate your follow of my new blog. May I quote/paraphrase you when it’s time to change my Odd compelling quote? “Ideals are nice and soul-stirring, but people tend to get blinded by them. It is the ability to perceive the minutely relevant changes instance to instance, circumstance to circumstance, that will carry you. It is not comfortably reductive idealism, but all-inclusory awareness that will let you navigate not just life, but all of existence.” This pretty much sums up my leading edge these days. Thanks, Lana

    Liked by 2 people

  3. As a child of the military, I spent the first 16 years of my life on bases in lots of places near and far. I completely agree with you about it simply being the same as any other population, except there is a comradery there that you don’t find in a lot of other places. Coming to a new station, you were expected and welcomed. That helped combat the fear you felt as a child in a new place.
    Also, thanks for the like. I appreciate all of those!

    Liked by 1 person

    • No problem, Ms. Sharron! The camaraderie I believe, is gained from people bonding in adverse conditions. It’s weird, but I’ve seen people get way tighter in combat, then turn backstabby in the rear. Sebastian Junger outlines a good case for this in his book “Tribe.”

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi Kent!

    I was wondering if I could grab a short quote from you in regards to: how did you go about attracting so many subscribers/followers?

    I’m writing a blog post on the subject and would love to get your input (sorry I couldn’t find an email address to pester you with haha). The rest of the bloggers I’ve contacted have submitted anywhere from 40-100 words. There will be a link to your blog in the heading as well 🙂

    Anyway thanks!

    Milly Schmidt

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks for following my blog, and I’m happy and grateful to be following yours. I like your background info. Your balanced outlook and blend of practicality and optimism are solidly good traits. I promise to read your work and comment on it as it prompts me to do.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Hi Kent,
    Thanks for the Like on my blog and the publication of Guardians’ Betrayal. You probably thought the title had to do with sci-fi, so I had to disappoint you there. I like the art work of your titles, beautiful.
    You might like my next novel about a military man; it is insprired by my dad’s years in the WWII, its title: Dutch Nazi Lover. I am shopping for a publisher, because I think it is valuable enough to be picked up by an established publisher. Good luck with your novels and your blog. It looks terrific.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank You Ms. Johanna! I’m not really a genre stickler, to be honest. Thank you for the compliment, and I wish you the best with your publishing adventures! Very motivating to connect with another author who’s pushing their work—I know the long, thankless hours that go into drafting a manuscript, and then the longer and even more thankless hours that go into making it readable, lol!

      Like

  7. I like the way you went about writing your bio. Mine, in comparison, is pretty stuffy. I appreciate you sharing your take on the military. I don’t often meet people with much to say about it that isn’t, as you pointed out, reductive.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. “I’m resigned to the idea that humans love to turn something into an easy-to-get-riled about, simplistic point of view.” And boom goes the dynamite. Spot on. Brilliant. And for the record, there is no proper “bio” or “meet-and-greet” style for a blog; the more unique it is, the better it rolls off the page. Looking forward to reading more of your stuff.

    Liked by 1 person

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