Musings

If you can reserve judgment of worth (whether someone is “good” or “bad”) and simply assess each action instance by instance and grasp how to frame them as inspirational anecdotes or cautionary tales, you can cast aside the veil of love and hate, of heroism and villainy, of damnation and worship, and surf a river of useful information.  I believe this is the most harmonious—and in the long term, stress-free—mode of being.

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48 thoughts on “Musings

      • You after a raft or a boat? I’m shore Loki could craft you one. Or probably not. He’s a cat, now. Or do you need an oar? I could use an oarsman. They don’t call me the whore of babylon for nuthin’. But just a reminder that certain words hold certain trigger responses from me… watch out if you don’t want me to blast off on your face. I retort, in your end – oh! Hey-oh! We can totes be MoredKAI and KENTGY! A written version of the regular shit show. I love that show.

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      • The Regular Show – it’s got Mordecai, Rigby, Skips, Benson, Gramps, Muscle Man. Not as insane as adventure time, weirder than archer. I’m pretty sure there’s another cartoon called 3 bears, too.
        I was just shoving our initials in there. Back to the regular show, obviously I’m Skips and Mordecai, and you’re Muscle Man and Rigby. Because I said so.

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      • I like adventure time but that’s just normal shit in my head anyway. Thats the thing when you’re a metatrope – I could be any and all of the characters. And everyone seems to have a different view of which princess I’d be. But I do love singing and making bacon pancakes so Jake. I’m most like Jake the dog. And Fiona the human. Mouthafuckit see what I mean? Uuuugggh. Ok. Outside of my brain. Let’s turn the mute button on that crazy tirade before it gives everyone a headache. Ok. Yes. I quite like the regular show. But I also don’t watch much tv or anything anymore. I’ve enjoyed Rick and Morty, but I haven’t watched a heap of it.

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      • I haven’t seen it, but my hubby has just told me about it. So.. yeah, I guess I am trying to sell magic carpet rides. Makes sense. Normally I’m Rick (when I’m teaching shit), but when I’m off the clock, I’m evil Morty.

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      • Haha, high school teacher. So yeah, I am tolerant. How can I tolerate annoying teenagers? Easy, “don’t make it my problem.”
        And they friggen love me, it’s sweet. They skip class to come to my classes, for some reason. Maybe because I don’t care what they say, more what they do.

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      • You might get a kick out of this then. I’m trained in English, text and writing. And I fucking hate teaching the English curriculum. It sucks all the fun out of reading and writing. So I much prefer learning support, and last year I taught industrial technology. My sub-majors were in art history, cinema studies and education. I’m a bona-fide super-over-qualified bullshit artist. Feck yehaw.

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      • Wow! Yeah, it must suck having to hammer kids over the heads about not using sentence fragments and knowing they’ll—in all likelihood—never know or care about the reasoning behind James Joyce’s epiphanies. I’d go NUTS! 😅

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  1. …..and really once you have crossed the internal threshold of ‘us and them’ isn’t that where you end up? We recognise all those things in ourselves whether we want to acknowledge them or not. “We need to sit on the rim of the well of darkness and fish for fallen light with patience” Pablo Neruda

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    • Indeed. It’s like the old days of jiu-jitsu, when they ignored leg locks, and eventually new people came along and asked, “why would you ignore one half of the body?” Both are useful, and given the circumstance, both light and dark become necessary in order to push into new territory and bring harmony to the collective.

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    • Why skip to the end? Why not enjoy what’s in front of you, given a specific ending becomes increasingly hard to guarantee in increasing levels of complexity/ambiguity, where the reward is greatest? In my opinion, as cliche as it may be, the reward is in the journey.

      As far as the purpose, consistently articulating and embodying age-old knowledge—so that it is practicalized for context and resonates with others—is the way to make sure that it stays alive, and doesn’t become relegated to the unthinking realms of dogma and slogans.

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      • Well what I mean is you cannot go to the next room unless you open the door in front of you. And you don’t open a door consciously. Opening a door is no fun. It has become just something that has to be done.

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      • I actually believe the opposite—that it is possible to evolve and open the door through conscious intent. I believe it is a distinct strength of being human—we don’t have to be nearly as reactive as other animals, and we can actually take pleasure in venturing into ambiguity and pushing our actualization. I believe this is the basis of the hero’s journey.

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      • Perhaps in some cases, but I don’t think it’s a mutually exclusive thing. I don’t believe speaking at length precludes meaningful listening, and certainly not meaningful dialogue. That’s a logical fallacy called a “false dichotomy,” I believe.

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      • Definitely in certain instances, but I think it demonstrates humility to articulate an inner conviction as best as possible, and embody it through action. Plenty of folks lie to themselves (well-known premise in psychology) about their true intentions, so it is extremely useful—I’d say essential—to quality-check beliefs and philosophies through interaction with the external world.

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      • Perhaps. I prefer to simply tackle the problems within my sphere of influence, and leave the rest up to the theorists. Not only is this practical, but it is also “spiritual,” (in a mystical sense, everything is “spiritual” by default) as your ego gets reduced because you must maintain a malleable identity which conforms to a problem, and then changes to fit the next. It also honors the mystical premise of humility, of Mystery, of leaving the transcendent beyond the prison of words and duality, because it doesn’t presume to know any definitive truth. It simply addresses the riddle that has been placed in front of you. As far as words being pulses of energy…I could take it or leave it. If that’s the paradigm that assists me with the immediate problem, I’ll take it.

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  2. Observation and reflection have simple advantages. Separation invites judgment and interpretation without complications. Interaction and relationship involve much more, and requires us to choose our responses and establish exchanges and communications that extend and exponentially expand the possibilities of knowing one another, including the other learning more from and about you. People are so complex given all the roles and contexts they serve, that I have given up trying to decide “who” a person is. I question who I am more every day and every situation.

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    • Good attitude, I’d say. Interacting with all aspects of existence is a way to reduce preconceptions and biases, as well as consistently keeping one’s self in check, because it requires someone to venture beyond their own insular echo chamber. Long story short, it is a way of reducing/killing the ego, in eastern spiritual parlance.

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  3. Thank you for your thoughts. So little thinking today, mainly because the “factories” pump out perverted words that were deep thoughts years ago in such saccharine, often mis-attributed clichés. I appreciate your musings and the responses you invite your readers to submit. We do not need to be snobs to think. It seems that anything not rote is “toxic” depending on your identity today;) I hope some young students get a chance to sample your Greco (Socratic)/Roman/Zen style. We could do with more questions and fewer assertions, especially among the thoughtless rabble fomenting hatred and neo-racism. Hasn’t anyone read Orwell, Huxley, or Rand in the past few decades? I have to admit I have not read your books, but I hope the idea that the individual can be valuable without being a slave is embedded.

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    • Hey, thanks man! I’m just paraphrasing what seems to work across eons and cultures as best as I can. Echo is specifically about how salvation lies in being able to see nuance and transcend tribal entrenchments. In the end it gets into some pretty crazy existential philosophy.

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