Give my books a read and a review!

What the Jaws-themed blowjay is going on, all you bonered-up suck-victims who are transfixed by your partner as they bob up and down and hum DA-dum, sending a thrill of fear racing up your spine before they do it again—DA-dum—holy fuck what is happening right now, DA-dum DA-dum dadumdadumDAAAAAA, now you can’t watch a shark movie without getting hard but you also can’t get a beej without trembling in sheer, unadulterated terror—

Dump their ass, NOW!  What kind of monster hums the goddamn Jaws theme while giving you a beej??? 

Anyways, now that I’ve got your attention, let me direct it towards my various-genred books!  First up is my YA fantasy:  A Door into Evermoor.  If you’re hankering for some psychedelic high school fun with a giant side of interdimensional monsters and teen genius hijinks, check out Kor’Thank:  Barbarian Valley Girl!  If you want a big ol’ helping of robot vs. wizard pew pew, along with an extra serving of existential philosophy, check out my science fiction series Echo!  And don’t forget to leave a positive review for them!  Positive reviews—even though they only take a minute or two of your time—are like $1000 tips for us indie authors.  Every one of them is SUPER appreciated!  #WritingCommunity

🙂 🙂 😀


21 thoughts on “Give my books a read and a review!

  1. The door to evermore is written well, however the story telling is a little choppy. You hop from a stream of consciousness to a world based scenario and it doesn’t transition smoothly, which can leave a reader confused for a millisecond.
    (i think the best way to break it up would be to go all terry pratchet and have the asterisks* with the thoughts and leave the main world happenings separated).
    Sometimes it get a little too existential and readers have to re-read a paragraph and flip between thinking about the book as a philosophy article and a fictional story.
    If you want to leave it that way you should include secondary paragraphs that explain things a little more indepth or more simply to transition the brain. You need thought bridges. Its like riding along one track without bridges over chasms.
    Thats my critique just from reading the 1 chapter.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Remember most readers don’t read or think about philosophy all the time. I do.. which is why I could somewhat follow..but most would get lost instantly.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I would consider two or three philosophical themes you want to impress upon the reader… then make a book of fiction that embodies that idea. Just one concept. Maybe two.
        JRR Tolkien took three books to capture one concept.

        Liked by 1 person

      • You threw the whole book concept at people in the first two three paragraphs, leave mystery. What is the door to evermore… why does he want to go there… dont give the book concept away at the beginning.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’d like to emphasize I’m not cranky or put off in my response (when I disagree in text, sometimes people misinterpret the tone). Thanks for the feedback, but I’m not interested in changing anything in the book.

        As far as the prologue, that’s the hook, it’s the intro that sets the stage for the three-volume story, which uses the portal template as a springboard into a thematic arc that is based off a mystical interpretation of Alan Watts describing the eternal return. What I’ve written in the beginning is by no means the whole book concept.

        As far as the flow or transitions or anything style-related, all that is written to my satisfaction. When I write, I don’t prioritize fame, money, grammar, other’s opinions of how I could make it smoother, or cater to this or that demographic. I prioritize my joy and fulfillment during the process, I write something I would have wanted to have read when I was a little kid under the covers, reading books with a flashlight because they captured my imagination. When I hit publish, I am satisfied that I have expressed myself as best I can at that particular moment, and I am ready to start working on the next story.

        Once again, I want to emphasize I’m not irritated by your feedback and I’m not blowing it off, it’s just that I’m coming at writing from a completely different perspective.

        Like

      • All valid, I guess for me as a reader it didn’t hook me into the story, but I am a pretty hard sell. I have only run across three of four authors I genuinely would re-read for the rest of my life. I hold all books up to those lens. I am a grammar nazi, I care a lot about transitions, etc. etc. I just saw you wanted a review. So I gave it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I appreciate the forthrightness! I’m in the same boat as far as some very popular books (I’ve read Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings multiple times, really trying to force myself to get why people like them, but I never took to them. Also Game of Thrones–I forced myself to watch 3 seasons but I couldn’t get into it).

        I didn’t even realize you were responding to my ad, lol! 😅 Been writing these silly ads for awhile, so my brain automatically thinks it’s just amazon and goodreads reviews that are connected to it, not chapter by chapter feedback.

        Since you said you have a science background, I suspect you’re using the word “valid” in the same context I learned it: within formal logic, or the idea that given a premise is true (also accepting all premises are unprovable without omniscience), then logical conclusions will be true in that context, which is how I learned the word “valid” applies. If that’s the way you’re using it, then I think that’s pretty cool! Years back, I got all into formal logic, because I realized communication was full of fallacy, especially false dichotomies and false equivalencies. Politicians love that stuff!

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      • I didn’t take philosophy in college, I learned about it slowly over the course of years, mostly because I ran into a few over arrogant people who twisted the concepts to suit their purposes. I had to learn about it to breakdown their straw man arguments during my inner thought process so I could move on from their bad premises internally.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I live within a very rigid moral and ethical framework that guides all my decision making. I can’t relate to or see eye to eye with people who adjust their morals and ethics like shifting sand to suit every scenario.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Interesting! I was the same when I was younger, but then I came to suspect that it’s a function of self-image. I’ve dealt with plenty of backstabbers, but I don’t think they ever saw themselves that way. I think they just had a shortage mentality and felt that in order to get their piece of the pie, they had to step on other peoples’ necks before the same could be done to them. I don’t think they ever saw themselves as an out-and-out villain.

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      • I can be an ass, but only after being stepped on for years. Then I draw a firm line in the sand and pummel them. Bullies deserve to get a hard dose of their medicine after a while.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I agree. I’m careful now, though, to not focus on how shitty they are, if it happens. I try and keep focused on the positive outcome I’m reaching for. That’s just me, though–I used to be very negative and overly vengeful, lol!

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