Musings

“I don’t know what the truth is.  Let me look at the evidence, formulate a strategy, and give it a shot.”  

That’s a way of being that fosters humility, effectiveness, and cuts through dogma.  From my perspective, it also embodies a deeper truth, for not only does it honor the statement “Faith without works is dead,” it also preserves the mystic’s idea of a transcendent truth—a truth that must remain nameless and mysterious (in the connotation that’s arguably touched upon by the title “Mystery School”), and can only be reached through action/experience.

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4 thoughts on “Musings

  1. I like the “not knowing” part of your action model. the Buddhist view on “logical mind,” obstacles, “attachments” as burdens, and “inaction” as action, could be added to your stance on “doing.”

    i like your mention of strategy because of what is included. Strategy begins with the end in mind, whether it is to change or preserve what is so. It allows for a broad range of results and tactics, whereas tactical plans may be more restricted and less flexible.

    I also like “way of being” as a standard, because it is akin to strategy, and it relies on honest commitment to any future that comes along.

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    • Indeed! I actually view myself more like a robot as I grow older and see how powerful it is to match action with evidence and know myself deeply enough to be able to establish my own personal code of ethics. To me, I feel like there’s less and less “Kent,” and I’m just simply doing what is most fulfilling, which is actually fairly predictable if handed a definable set of conditions.

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      • What a paradox! Fulfilling a lesser “Kent.” If you are referring to ego/id as “Kent,” I do not see that as robotic. What makes life worthwhile, shifts from moment to moment. We are temporary, instinct-driven, beings, barely under rational control of ourselves. The balance of meeting our “animal” needs while cohabiting with other people is not easy to achieve.

        I like the interviews with the Dalai Lama, where he plays with the interviewer, acting like a young child. This man has the freedom to declare fun as a priority one minute and loving the world the next.

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      • Indeed! All according to the evidence, which, if life is the greatest teacher, is a rough avenue through which it communicates. This also segues into concepts of harmony and detachment, in my opinion.

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